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The Report Card by Andrew Clements touches on a lot of hot topics that can bring about some lively class discussions. It is a great book to use in your classroom or homeschool for a whole class novel study, small book groups, or individual book studies.

We read a lot of books about the underdog, the kid fighting learning problems or disabilities in some way and they are fantastic in helping students gain empathy towards others that may struggle in different ways than we do. The Report Card flips the narrative and discusses what it may be like to be the smartest kid in class. What stigma does that give a student? How might it make them feel as much as an outcast as the student with a learning disability?

The Report Card also brings about the controversial topic of standardized testing and how it affects students of all abilities. How valuable are these tests? Do they cause more harm than good? My personal opinion is a resounding YES, but I digress for this book review. 😉

From the Book Jacket:

Nora Rose Rowley is a genius, but don’t tell anyone. She’s managed to make it to the fifth grade without anyone figuring out that she’s not just an ordinary kid, and she wants to keep it that way.

But then Nora gets fed up with the importance everyone attaches to test scores and grades, and she purposely brings home a terrible report card just to prove a point. Suddenly the attention she’s successfully avoided all her life is focused on her, and her secret is out. And that’s when things start to get really complicated….

I offer a complete novel study to accompany The Report Card for use in the classroom or homeschool. The unit includes both a printable format and a Google Drive™ format for use in a paperless classroom or with Google Classroom.

A report card laying on a desk

I think you will be hard-pressed to find a student who can’t relate to someone in The Report Card. This book will drive some great discussions in your classroom and will help students look at learning and testing in a different light and hopefully realize that a person is so much more than a test score or a grade.


Are you interested in reading about and sharing ideas with other educators on using children’s literature in your classroom? My goal is to bring together teachers and homeschoolers who teach grades 3-8 and use novels with their students. I’d love for you to join me to learn, share, and grow together!

Click here or the image below to join my Facebook group, Book Talk with The Teaching Bank!

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*The Teaching Bank participates in the Amazon Associate Program and earns a fee from qualifying purchases made on the Amazon.com site.