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A Tale of Courage and Bravery with Despereaux

A Tale of Courage and Bravery with Despereaux

The Tale of Despereaux is the story of a mouse, a princess, some soup, and a spool of thread! It’s a tale of courage and bravery and overcoming the odds. Told in parts (Books) and a Coda showcasing different points of view, it is a great book to use in your classroom or homeschool for a whole class novel study, small book groups, or individual book studies.

 

 

 

The Tale of Despereaux was first published in 2003 by the award-winning, Kate DiCamillo. Among the many awards bestowed upon the novel, it won the acclaimed Newbery Medal in 2004, has been named one of the “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children” by the NEA, and was ranked #51 of the all-time best children’s novels by the School Library Journal.

Summary of The Tale of Despereaux:

*From the book jacket

Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other’s lives. And what happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out.

 

 

I offer a complete novel study to accompany The Tale of Despereaux for use in the classroom or homeschool. The unit includes both a printable format and a Google Drive™ format for use in a paperless classroom or with Google Classroom.

 

Despereaux Tilling is a hero for all time. Despite all the odds stacked against him he courageously faces his quest in this uplifting story of perseverance and bravery to find his true destiny.



Are you interested in reading about and sharing ideas with other educators on using children’s literature in your classroom? My goal is to bring together teachers and homeschoolers who teach grades 3-8 and use novels with their students. I’d love for you to join me to learn, share, and grow together!

Click here or the image below to join my Facebook group, Book Talk with The Teaching Bank!

Click to join Book Talk with The Teaching Bank


*The Teaching Bank participates in the Amazon Associate Program and earns a fee from qualifying purchases made on the Amazon.com site.

Live the Absurdity of James and the Giant Peach

Live the Absurdity of James and the Giant Peach

James and the Giant Peach is a fabulous, classic novel by Roald Dahl. True to the Roald Dahl style, it is quirky, funny, and absolutely absurd. Everything students love in a book! It is a great book to use in your classroom or homeschool for a whole class novel study, small book groups, or individual book studies.

 

 

 

Roald Dahl is the expert at writing fantastical stories that grab the reader’s attention. He makes you empathize with his downtrodden main character, and the reader becomes attached as the character goes on to great victory. In between, the language and the fantasy entrances you.

From the Book Jacket:

When James accidentally drops some magic crystals by the old peach tree, strange things start to happen. The peach at the top of the tree begins to grow, and before long it’s as big as a house. When James discovers a secret entranceway into the fruit and crawls inside, he meets wonderful new friends–the Old-Green-Grasshopper, the dainty Ladybug, and the Centipede of the multiple boots. After years of feeling like an outsider in his aunts’ house, James finally found a place where he belongs. With a snip of the stem, the peach household starts rolling away–and the adventure begins!

 

I offer a complete novel study to accompany James and the Giant Peach for use in the classroom or homeschool. The unit includes both a printable format and a Google Drive™ format for use in a paperless classroom or with Google Classroom.

Your students will be enchanted by James and his cast of friends, they won’t want to put the book down through the adventures James and his friends encounter on their great peach journey. They will cheer as everything turns out peachy for James. This is a great story to use for fun and class bonding. It sends a great message about not accepting the cards that are given, but to strive for the unimaginable, no matter how absurd it may be!



Are you interested in reading about and sharing ideas with other educators on using children’s literature in your classroom? My goal is to bring together teachers and homeschoolers who teach grades 3-8 and use novels with their students. I’d love for you to join me to learn, share, and grow together!

Click here or the image below to join my Facebook group, Book Talk with The Teaching Bank!

Click to join Book Talk with The Teaching Bank


*The Teaching Bank participates in the Amazon Associate Program and earns a fee from qualifying purchases made on the Amazon.com site.

How Do YOU Eat Fried Worms?

How Do YOU Eat Fried Worms?

Billy is not one to back down from a challenge. Now, the challenge is to eat 15 worms in 15 days. Will Billy succeed? How will his creativity make this challenge more palatable? How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell will show just how creative and courageous Billy can be! It is a great book to use in your classroom or homeschool for a whole class novel study, small book groups, or individual book studies.

 

 

 

For us adults, the premise of eating worms is gross, for your students, it is hilarious and encourages them to keep reading. The gross-out factor is enough to pull in even the most reluctant reader in your class!

From the Book Jacket:

Because of a bet, Billy is in the uncomfortable position of having to eat fifteen worms in fifteen days. The worms are supplied by his opponent, whose motto is “The bigger and juicier, the better!” At first, Billy’s problem is whether or not he can swallow the worm placed before him, even with a choice of condiments from peanut butter to horseradish. But later it looks as if Billy will win, and the challenge becomes getting to the worm to eat it. Billy’s family, after checking with the doctor, takes everything in stride. They even help Billy through his gastronomic ordeal, which twists and turns with each new day, leaving the outcome of the bet continually in doubt. 

 

 

I offer a complete novel study to accompany How to Eat Fried Worms for use in the classroom or homeschool. The unit includes both a printable format and a Google Drive™ format for use in a paperless classroom or with Google Classroom.

The idea of eating worms is gross, but this book is so much more than that. It’s about perseverance through a challenge, sticking to your word, and using your creativity and smarts to overcome. This is a great message for your upper elementary students.



Are you interested in reading about and sharing ideas with other educators on using children’s literature in your classroom? My goal is to bring together teachers and homeschoolers who teach grades 3-8 and use novels with their students. I’d love for you to join me to learn, share, and grow together!

Click here or the image below to join my Facebook group, Book Talk with The Teaching Bank!

Click to join Book Talk with The Teaching Bank


*The Teaching Bank participates in the Amazon Associate Program and earns a fee from qualifying purchases made on the Amazon.com site.

A Frindle of an Invention!

A Frindle of an Invention!

Frindle is the first novel by award-winning author, Andrew Clements. It is a great book to use in your classroom or homeschool for a whole class novel study, small book groups, or individual book studies.

 

 

 

Nick is a fifth-grader who is full of creative ideas but isn’t the best at executing them in the most appropriate ways. He’s a student that many kids can relate to and the book has a great lesson about how you can use your creativity for good to lead you to great success.

From the Book Jacket:

Is Nick Allen a troublemaker? He really just likes to liven things up at school — and he’s always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he’s got the inspiration for his best plan ever…the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is in an uproar, and Nick has become a local hero. His teacher wants Nick to put an end to all this nonsense, but the funny thing is frindle doesn’t belong to Nick anymore. The new word is spreading across the country, and there’s nothing Nick can do to stop it. 

 

 

I offer a complete novel study to accompany Frindle for use in the classroom or homeschool. The unit includes both a printable format and a Google Drive™ format for use in a paperless classroom or with Google Classroom.

Frindle explores the question of how language is created, used, and changed. It shows how even a fifth-grader can influence how we use language. I encourage you to introduce your students to Nick and the almighty Frindle! You will love where it takes you!



Are you interested in reading about and sharing ideas with other educators on using children’s literature in your classroom? My goal is to bring together teachers and homeschoolers who teach grades 3-8 and use novels with their students. I’d love for you to join me to learn, share, and grow together!

Click here or the image below to join my Facebook group, Book Talk with The Teaching Bank!

Click to join Book Talk with The Teaching Bank


*The Teaching Bank participates in the Amazon Associate Program and earns a fee from qualifying purchases made on the Amazon.com site.